Caves and Sinkholes To Visit In Florida

Best 15 Caves and Sinkholes To Visit In Florida (updated)

Florida is a land of extremes, with sandy beaches stretching for hundreds of miles on one side and dense forests covering the other. Florida also has its share of caverns full of stalagmites and stalactites.

The state has more than 1,200 caves within its borders, home to an astonishing variety of creatures that have evolved in isolation for thousands or even millions of years.

Here are 15 of the best caves in Florida to explore on your next vacation.

1. Devil’s Den

 Devil's Den

Located in Williston, Devil’s Den is a widespread network of limestone caves for its spelunking opportunities. The caves are also home to numerous bats and other creatures.

Devil’s Den is an excellent cave for those who want to explore and see the underground world. If you’re going in the summer, it’s a good idea to bring a wetsuit. It can be pretty chilly if you’re not prepared. As with any location that has a history of bats, there is a risk that rabies could exist due to contact with bats. Rabies vaccinations are recommended.

Devil’s Den is a network of limestone caves located in Williston, Florida. It is famous for its spelunking opportunities, as well as its bats and other creatures.

2. Florida Caverns

Florida Caverns

The Florida Caverns are located in Marianna and offer various activities, including cave tours, camping, fishing, and swimming. The caverns were formed more than 45 million years ago and offer a glimpse into the past.

The caverns are home to blind cavefish, crayfish, spiders, millipedes, bats, mosquitoes – basically everything that lives deep within caves. Visitors should bring a jacket because it can get cold inside the caverns even though it’s 90 degrees Fahrenheit outside.

Florida Caverns are located in Marianna and offer a wide variety of activities. They were formed more than 45 million years ago and featured tours including camping, fishing, and swimming. The caverns are also home to blind cavefish, crayfish, spiders, millipedes, and bats.

3. Ginnie Springs

Ginnie Springs is a popular swimming spot and camping area that offers plenty of opportunities to explore the natural world. The springs were formed more than 10,000 years ago and are now a designated National Wildlife Refuge.

The waters at Ginnie Springs are crystal clear and offer a view of the riverbed below. There are also plenty of caves to explore, including the Devil’s Eye Cave, home to numerous bats.

Ginnie Springs is a popular swimming spot and camping area that offers plenty of opportunities to explore the natural world. The springs were formed more than 10,000 years ago and are now a designated National Wildlife Refuge. The water is crystal clear, and visitors can see the riverbed below.

4. Andrew’s Cave

Andrew’s Cave is located in the Ocala National Forest and was formed during the Pleistocene Era. It features an entrance chamber, a narrow passageway called The Birth Canal, two large rooms – one home to a high ceiling – and many smaller chambers.

With more than 1,200 feet of passageways, Andrew’s Cave offers opportunities for novice spelunkers to explore much of its interior with proper training. It has become popular over the years because it is relatively free of the common contaminants in many caves near major metropolitan areas.

Andrew’s Cave is located in the Ocala National Forest and was formed during the Pleistocene Era.

5. Aucilla River Sink

The Aucilla River Sink is a sinkhole that was formed when the Aucilla River disappeared underground. It is located in Jefferson County and is more than 550 feet wide and 150 feet deep.

The sinkhole features a variety of animals, including alligators, turtles, deer, raccoons, and a wide variety of birds. In addition, numerous caves offer opportunities for exploration.

The sinkhole was formed when the Aucilla River disappeared underground.

6. Blue Sink

Blue Sink is located in Highlands County and features a cylindrical shaft that narrows from 65 feet wide to 20 feet wide. The sinkhole has numerous stalagmites and stalactites, as well as passages that lead to different caverns.

Blue Sink is known for the blue glow that emanates from its walls, but it’s also home to a variety of wildlife, including birds, owls, bats, snakes, frogs, salamanders – even alligators have been spotted there.

7. Brevard Caves

The Brevard Caves are a series of caves located in the heart of the Kennedy Space Center. They were formed more than 2 million years ago and offer a glimpse into the area’s history.

The caves are home to numerous bats, as well as spiders, scorpions, and centipedes. They are open for exploration, but visitors should be aware that there is no lighting inside the caves, and it can be challenging to find your way out.

The Brevard Caves are a series of caves located in the heart of the Kennedy Space Center.

8. Emerald Sink

Emerald Sink is located in Bradford County and was formed during the mid-Pleistocene Era. The sinkhole features many different ecosystems, including forests, swamps, lakes, rivers, wetlands – even dunes that are more than 60 feet tall.

The sinkhole has become popular with cave explorers because it offers a wide variety of wildlife along with its impressive geological formations. It is also home to the endangered bonneted bat and has been designated as an ecological reserve. Emerald Sink is located in Bradford County and was formed during the mid-Pleistocene Era.

9. Econfina River Sink

The Econfina River Sink is a sinkhole that was formed when the Econfina River disappeared underground. It is located in Bay County and is more than 1,000 feet wide and 250 feet deep.

The sinkhole features a variety of animals, including alligators, turtles, deer, raccoons, and a wide variety of birds. In addition, numerous caves offer opportunities for exploration.

The sinkhole was formed when the Econfina River disappeared underground.

10. Istachatta Caves

The Istachatta Caves are a series of caves located in Levy County. The caves were formed about 1 million years ago and feature a second entrance that is underwater during the wet season.

Istachatta Cave’s most notable feature is a lake that measures more than 300 feet long, 20 feet wide, and 13 feet deep. It has become a popular spot for swimming and canoeing because it offers an alternative to local beaches during Florida’s notoriously hot summers.

11. Morgan City Cave

Morgan City Cave is located in Wakulla County and features two entrances – one on land and one below water level. The Cave submerged when sea levels rose after the last ice age caused changes in climate patterns around 8000 BC.

The Cave offers a glimpse into life 10,000 years ago and features numerous stalactites and stalagmites. Some organisms have not been found anywhere else on Earth, making it a popular tourist destination despite its remote location. Morgan City Cave is located in Wakulla County and features two entrances – one on land and one below water level.

12. Merritt’s Mill Pond Sink Cave

Merritt’s Mill Pond Sink Cave is located in Taylor County and was formed when Merritt’s Mill Pond disappeared underground. The Cave is open for exploration and is home to a variety of animals, including alligators, turtles, deer, raccoons, and a wide variety of birds. In addition, numerous caves offer opportunities for exploration.

The Cave was formed when Merritt’s Mill Pond disappeared underground.

13. Devil’s Millhopper

Devil’s Millhopper is located in Alachua County and was formed thousands of years ago when groundwater eroded some lands. The sinkhole features a 91-foot deep cavity that has become popular with tourists looking for an exciting adventure that does not require swimming or climbing equipment.

The sinkhole is home to numerous bats and insects, as well as alligators and turtles. It also features several trails and platforms where visitors can enjoy the surrounding wildlife without any danger of falling into the hole.

14. Rainbow Spring Cave

Rainbow Spring Cave was formed about 15,000 years ago by water flowing from a nearby spring. It is located in Marion County and spans more than 2,000 feet.

The Cave features several impressive formations, including stalactites, stalagmites, and columns. It is also home to a variety of bats and is open for exploration by experienced cavers.

15. Blue Grotto

Blue Grotto is located in Taylor County and was formed when a sea cave collapsed thousands of years ago. The sinkhole became a popular tourist destination once people realized it featured a large underground lake and natural blue light thanks to sunlight passing through an opening at the surface.

The sinkhole features numerous stalactites, stalagmites, and columns, as well as ladders for those who want to explore it from top to bottom. It also has a clean beach where swimmers and snorkelers can enjoy the crystal clear waters without worrying about boat traffic or dangerous currents.

Conclusion

Sinkholes are not just a danger to Florida residents; they also offer an opportunity for exploration.

The 15 sinkholes listed in this article are just the beginning – countless other locations have formed in Florida over time, but it would take forever to list them all here. If you are interested in exploring one of these beautiful formations, make sure you know what you are doing so you don’t put yourself in any danger.

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